England’s Bloodiest Day: The Battle of the Somme

In the entire 15 years of the Afghan War and the Second Iraq War, the United States suffered 58,000 casualties, including 6,600 deaths. On July 1, 1916, the British Army lost more than that during the first day of the Battle of the Somme, making it the single bloodiest day in British history.

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British troops leave their trenches to begin the Battle of the Somme

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ALH84001: Proof of Life on Mars?

In 1996, a team of scientists announced that they had discovered signs of single-celled bacteria in a piece of Mars rock, indicating that the Red Planet had its own extraterrestrial life a few billion years ago. At the time, the announcement caused a sensation. But today, further research has led most scientists to dismiss the claim.

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ALH84001 on display at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History

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The House of Hanover: How a Minor German Noble Became the King of England

Nothing symbolizes “England” more than the Royal family, the House of Windsor. But in reality, the Windsor family is not English at all–it is German. How a German aristocrat came to be King of England and form a dynasty that would rule for 300 years (most recently under an assumed name), is a story of religious conflict and near-civil war.

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King George I of England

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